Digital Craft Manifestation

Glitch art is defined as  “the aestheticization of digital or analog errors…by either corrupting digital code/data or by physically manipulating electronic devices.”

After looking through the different avenues of craft making and finding the manifestation of digital art, I decided to demonstrate how easy it is to create your own. I typed in ‘make your own glitch art’ and clicked on the first link which led me to the website you see in the video. Using drag queens Violet Chachki and Miss Fame, I made a basic example of glitch art by playing around with the levels of seed, iteration, and the amount of ‘glitch.’

The experimental effects of material to digital transformation opens up an entirely new platform for content creation. Instead of manual labour, craft and experimental works can be created at the click of a button. New medium, new message.

Feature image: x

6 thoughts on “Digital Craft Manifestation

  1. chrisbeans says:

    Great post, Cat! Both your video and blogpost were short and direct and you didn’t drag the topic on for an excessive amount of time, which I really enjoyed. I like the fact that you made it a point to emphasise the ease at which creating glitch art is, only needing to click the first link to make the video you embedded – Also, your choice to use Violet Chachki and Miss Fame for your glitch art was a great choice (because they are art forms themselves). Some further elaboration on glitch art and its relation to digital craft making would’ve added more depth to the topic, but nonetheless this is a great post!

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  2. Zoe Majstorovic says:

    I love how different this post is. The use of the video was amazing, as it just backed up your information even more. I would of loved if you wrote a bit more, but your information was already straight to the point, which i really liked. Well done on a great blog.

    Like

  3. Rebecca says:

    I love your tutorial on how easy it is to make glitch art. These days there are a variety of ways of making it and I found your example a simple way to get the desired effect you want, instead of the trail and error process of some of the other techniques.

    Like

  4. BiancaBeattieWilmott says:

    I tried to make glitch art without using some kind of tutorial by editing the text of a picture and all I managed to achieve is some black lines on my image. You could hardly call it art. Turns out it’s harder than it looks but as you’ve demonstrated there are simple tools that do the hard work for you. So have these apps trivialised the integrity of glitch art or do you think that they enable creatives by expanding limitations?

    @notspeltwithak slaying on #BCM112 feed and also providing examples of great blog posts with embedded media that expands on the points being made.

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  5. orangesarepink says:

    I really like how you’ve included the process of how you created your glitch art in the video, it helps give a new layer of understanding how you came to that final glitchy product.
    You mentioned at the end of your post that glitch art removes the aspect of manual labour, instead replacing it with the click of a button, but does it completely remove the need for manual labour or just come as a secondary tool to support i? Does this result in a product which worships only the glitches in the piece and ignores the ‘original content’ which is a byproduct of the manual labour before the editing process of the glitch begins?

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